Quick Guide To LASIK And PRK

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Quick Guide To LASIK And PRK 1

Here You Can Find:
What Is Eye Refractive Surgery?
How Does Before Compare To Today’s Laser Surgery?
Can Patients Undergo Surgery On Both Eyes On The Same Day?
Who Can Undergo LASIK?
Who Can Undergo PRK?
How Long IS PRK?
Do The Surgery Techniques Hurt?
What Are The Preparations Prior To LASIK and PRK?
What Steps Are Done On Surgery Day?
When To Start Driving After Surgery and Resume Work?
When To Have Follow-Up Care


What Is Eye Refractive Surgery?

Refractive eye surgery refers to any surgical procedure used to fix vision problems. In the recent years, we have seen huge advances in this field. Until contact lenses were popularized in the 1950s, eyeglasses had been the only practical way to correct refractive vision errors. Refractive and laser eye surgery allow many patients to see better than any other time in their lives.

Radial keratotomy was one of the first incisional refractive procedures. The concept was first used more than 50 years ago in the Juntendo University in Japan. Now, several modern approaches to refractive eye surgery range from laser reshaping of the eye’s surface in procedures such as LASIK and PRK.

How Does Before Compare To Today’s Laser Surgery?

Photo-Refractive Keratectomy (PRK) is the first laser refractive surgery to correct vision before today’s best-known LASIK procedure. Although post-PRK recovery requires more time than that of LASIK, PRK is still commonly performed and offers some patients greater advantages than the former.

PRK is particularly suitable for people with thin corneas or suffering from particular corneal problems. The PRK technique is less invasive than LASIK and presents an operative procedure without the possible complications caused by the creation of a corneal flap.

With LASIK surgery, recovery is defined faster. A thin flap is created on the cornea. The flap of tissue is lifted and the computer-controlled surgical laser carefully reshapes the layers of the cornea to repair imperfections in curvature that lead to distorted vision. The flap, that is not visible to others, will secure itself back to the eye, however, it will always remain.

Can Patients Undergo Surgery On Both Eyes On The Same Day?

Yes, it is possible to do so. However, it is more likely that PRK surgery is done on the second eye after a few weeks’ time considering the longer recovery period. On the other hand, LASIK procedure is normally done on both eyes at the same time. It is best to consult your eye surgeon early.

Quick Guide To LASIK And PRK 2

Who Can Undergo LASIK?

By shaping an irregularly shaped cornea into a more normal shape, LASIK corrects astigmatism. Nearsighted individuals will have LASIK to flatten the cornea that is too steep. Conversely, farsighted ones will have the procedure to have a steeper cornea.

It is important to note that one has to have truthful expectations when considering LASIK as the refractive eye surgery to undergo. Above 90 percent of LASIK cases are done with 20/40 vision without the use of eyeglasses or contact lenses. Examine whether LASIK’s achievable 20/40 vision will suffice one’s line of work or particular hobbies or activities.

Who Can Undergo PRK?

As standard procedure, the eye surgeon notes some general points to qualify a patient. The same applies to patients considering LASIK. Conditions such as glaucoma, cataract, infections, autoimmune diseases should not be existent prior to the surgery so as not to impact postoperative recovery. Ideally, the patient is at least twenty-one (21) years of age unless stated otherwise. Nursing or pregnant patients may also be checked for hormonal imbalance.

PRK offers an excellent success rate and an ideal alternative for patients who may not be a good candidate for LASIK eye surgery. Similar to the latter, it is also an outpatient surgery and takes only about five (5) to fifteen (15) minutes to complete in each eye.

Patients who have any of the following are not candidates to PRK:

  • thin corneas
  • corneal disease
  • glaucoma or cataract (advanced)
  • diabetes, pregnant, or nursing
  • changing refractive error

How Long IS PRK?

Both LASIK and PRK are outpatient procedures that approximately takes five (5) to (15) minutes per eye to complete.

Do The Surgery Techniques Hurt?

PRK exposes deeper parts of the cornea that may lead to more discomfort after surgery compared to LASIK. Generally, whether it’s LASIK or PRK, the procedure is painless as anesthetic drops are placed prior to the surgery. Should it be necessary, pain medication may be prescribed.

What Are The Preparations Prior To LASIK and PRK?

Needless to say, an exam is done to make sure that the patient is eligible to undergo the surgery. The eye surgeon uses a corneal topographer to electronically map the whole eye to successfully attain error-free outcomes. Tests for the aforementioned general guidelines will be done as well.

What Steps Are Done On Surgery Day?

During the procedure, the patient lies comfortably with the laser system on top of the face. Vision correction is done on one eye after the other. The patient may choose to have the correction on the other eye right after the first or on a separate surgery day. Eye drops (anesthetic) are then used to numb the eye. After which, the surgeon proceeds with the short surgery.

Quick Guide To LASIK And PRK 3

When To Start Driving After Surgery and Resume Work?

Most eye doctors advise PRK patients three (3) days of rest before returning to work unlike LASIK patients who may do so a day after the surgery.

When To Have Follow-Up Care?

As determined by your doctor, some are advised to have their first checkup the day after the surgery. A week or a month later will be the next. For some, it may be different as you will be properly informed of when more visits are necessary.

Should you have more questions unanswered, the perfect source of information is your eye surgeon. To cover everything you have in mind, make sure to set your appointments early.